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Heaven's Coast: A Memoir

Heaven's Coast: A Memoir
 

The American author's homosexual lover, Wally Roberts, died of AIDS. In this book Doty tells the story of their relationship, the effect the disease had on their lives, and Roberts's death and the aftermath. He examines the nature of AIDS as opposed to other illnesses, and the re... read full description below.

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Quick Reference

ISBN 9780099731610
Barcode 9780099731610
Published 25 July 1997 by Vintage
Format Paperback, New edition
Alternate Format(s) View All (3 other possible title(s) available)
Author(s) By Doty, Mark
Availability Indent title (sourced internationally), usually ships 4-6 weeks post release/order

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  • $19.99 Wheelers price

Full details for this title

ISBN-13 9780099731610
ISBN-10 0099731614
Stock Available
Status Indent title (sourced internationally), usually ships 4-6 weeks post release/order
Publisher Vintage
Imprint Vintage
Publication Date 25 July 1997
International Publication Date 5 June 1997
Publication Country United Kingdom United Kingdom
Format Paperback, New edition
Edition New edition
Author(s) By Doty, Mark
Category Biography & Autobiography: General
AIDS: social aspects
HIV / AIDS
Home Nursing & Caring
Coping With Illness
Coping With Death & Bereavement
Number of Pages 313
Dimensions Width: 129mm
Height: 198mm
Spine: 18mm
Weight 225g
Interest Age 19+ years
Reading Age 19+ years
Library of Congress Gay men, United States, Biography, AIDS (Disease), Patients
NBS Text Autobiography: Science, Technology & Medical
ONIX Text College/higher education;Professional and scholarly
Dewey Code 362.19697920092
Catalogue Code Not specified

Description of this Book

The American author's homosexual lover, Wally Roberts, died of AIDS in 1993. In this book Doty tells the story of their relationship, the effect the disease had on their lives, and Roberts's death and the aftermath. He examines the nature of AIDS as opposed to other illnesses, the responses of society, the frustration of medical care, and the burden of caring for the dying at home.

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Awards, Reviews & Star Ratings

US Review Asking, What does a writer do, when the world collapses, but write?, Doty, whose world collapsed when his lover died, gives an answer that's both generous and indulgent. In a look back at the period before, during, and after Wally Roberts succumbed to complications of AIDS, the author (a winner of the National Book Critics Circle award for poetry) walks a path between the practical and the poetic, the enraged and the calm. On one hand, he's got helpful observations for support partners - The lower one goes in the medical system, it seems, the more humanity, the more hands-on help, the more genuine care. On the other, he's ready to turn profound on death's many approaching moments, especially its final one - . . . he is most himself, even if that self empties out into no one, swift river hurrying into the tumble of rivers, out of individuality, into the great rushing whirlwind of currents. Putting the puzzle of his life back together after Roberts's demise upset it, Doty returns to the Boston house where the proud and very out pair first lived together (but in separate apartments); recalls the Vermont homes they shared; and fills in the final Provincetown years. He visits landscapes here and abroad, finding reminders - and metaphors and avatars - of their relationship wherever he looks. He also writes with love about the friends who filled the couple's days with joy and anxiety (a self-destructive poet identified only as Lynda particularly delights and infuriates Dory). He commemorates Arden and Beau, two rollicking dogs who kept things much happier than they might otherwise have been. A poet with a quick memory for poems he didn't write, Dory is angry at the realities of the world when it unleashes physical and moral diseases, and grateful when it shows a kinder face. A book very much like grief itself in that it's sometimes awkward, often uncontrolled, and always deeply felt. (Kirkus Reviews)

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Author's Bio

The author of nine previous books of poetry and five books of prose, Mark Doty's many honours include the National Book Award, the National Book Critics Circle Award and T. S. Eliot Prize. He lives in New York.

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