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Mind and Cosmos: Why the Materialist Neo-Darwinian Conception of Nature is Almost Certainly False

Mind and Cosmos: Why the Materialist Neo-Darwinian Conception of Nature is Almost Certainly False

In Mind and Cosmos, Thomas Nagel argues that the widely accepted world view of materialist naturalism is untenable. The mind-body problem cannot be confined to the relation between animal minds and animal bodies. If materialism cannot accommodate consciousness and other mind-rela... read full description below.

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ISBN 9780199919758
Barcode 9780199919758
Published 6 September 2012 by Oxford University Press (S3)
Format Hardback
Author(s) By Nagel, Thomas
Availability Indent title (internationally sourced), usually ships 4-6 weeks

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Full details for this title

ISBN-13 9780199919758
ISBN-10 0199919755
Stock Available
Status Indent title (internationally sourced), usually ships 4-6 weeks
Publisher Oxford University Press (S3)
Imprint Oxford University Press Inc
Publication Date 6 September 2012
Publication Country United States United States
Format Hardback
Author(s) By Nagel, Thomas
Category Non-Fiction (Child / Teen)
Metaphysics & Ontology
Philosophy Of Mind
Religion & Beliefs
Philosophy Of Religion
Philosophy Of Science
Impact Of Science & Technology On Society
Number of Pages 144
Dimensions Width: 145mm
Height: 211mm
Spine: 16mm
Weight 294g
Interest Age 19+ years
Reading Age 19+ years
Library of Congress Cosmology, Darwin, Charles, Creation, Science - Philosophy, Cosmogony
NBS Text Philosophy
ONIX Text College/higher education
Dewey Code 146.3
Catalogue Code 327075

Description of this Book

In Mind and Cosmos Thomas Nagel argues that the widely accepted world view of materialist naturalism is untenable. The mind-body problem cannot be confined to the relation between animal minds and animal bodies. If materialism cannot accommodate consciousness and other mind-related aspects of reality, then we must abandon a purely materialist understanding of nature in general, extending to biology, evolutionary theory, and cosmology. Since minds are features of biological systems that have developed through evolution, the standard materialist version of evolutionary biology is fundamentally incomplete. And the cosmological history that led to the origin of life and the coming into existence of the conditions for evolution cannot be a merely materialist history. An adequate conception of nature would have to explain the appearance in the universe of materially irreducible conscious minds, as such. No such explanation is available, and the physical sciences, including molecular biology, cannot be expected to provide one. The book explores these problems through a general treatment of the obstacles to reductionism, with more specific application to the phenomena of consciousness, cognition, and value. The conclusion is that physics cannot be the theory of everything.

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Awards, Reviews & Star Ratings

NZ Review <br> The book's wider questions - its awe-inspiring questions - turn outward to address the uncanny cognizability of the universe around us. ... He's simply doing the old-fashioned Socratic work of gadfly, probing for gaps in what science thinks it knows. -- Louis B. Jones, The Threepenny Review<p><br> [Attacks] the hidden hypocrisies of many reductionists, secularists, and those who wish to have it both ways on religious modes of thinking ... Fully recognizes the absurdities (my word, not his) of dualism, and thinks them through carefully and honestly. --Tyler Cowen, Marginal Revolution<p><br>
UK Review Bertrams Star Rating: 2 stars (out of 5)

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Author's Bio

Thomas Nagel is University Professor in the Department of Philosophy and the School of Law at New York University. His books include The Possibility of Altruism, The View from Nowhere, and What Does It All Mean?: A Very Short Introduction to Philosophy. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy. In 2008, he was awarded the Rolf Schock Prize in Logic and Philosophy and the Balzan Prize in Moral Philosophy.

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