Wheelers Books
Contemporary Korean Cinema: Culture, Identity and Politics

Contemporary Korean Cinema: Culture, Identity and Politics (Hardback, illustrated edition)

By Lee, Hyangjin
Index by Norris, Mary

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This study defines the significance of filmmaking and film viewing in Korean society. It covers the introduction of motion pictures in 1903, Korean cinema during the Japanese colonial period (1910-45) and the development of North and South Korean cinema up to the 1990s.

ISBN 9780719060076
Barcode 9780719060076
Published 15 March 2001 by Manchester University Press
Format Hardback, illustrated edition
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Full details for this title

ISBN-13 9780719060076
ISBN-10 0719060079
Stock Available
Status Title is temporarily out of stock
Publisher Manchester University Press
Imprint Manchester University Press
Publication Date 15 March 2001
Publication Country United Kingdom United Kingdom
Format Hardback, illustrated edition
Edition illustrated edition
Author(s) By Lee, Hyangjin
Index by Norris, Mary
Category Film Theory & Criticism
Number of Pages 256
Dimensions Width: 138mm
Height: 216mm
Spine: 13mm
Weight 408g
Interest Age 19+ years
Reading Age 19+ years
Library of Congress Motion pictures, Korea, History, National characteristics in motion pictures, Social aspects
NBS Text Film, TV & Radio
ONIX Text College/higher education;Professional and scholarly
Dewey Code 791.4309519
Catalogue Code Not specified

Description of this Book

This examination of the role of Korean film as a cultural text of Koreans in both the North and South focuses on the conflicting self-identities of a people still strongly committed to their common cultural traditions despite political division. This study defines the significance of filmmaking and film viewing in Korean society. It covers the introduction of motion pictures in 1903, Korean cinema during the Japanese colonial period (1910-45) and the development of North and South Korean cinema up to the 1990s. It introduces the works of Korea's major directors, and analyzes the Korean film industry in terms of film production, distribution and reception. Based on this historical analysis, the study investigates ideological constructs in 17 films, eight from North Korea and nine from South Korea.

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Awards, Reviews & Star Ratings

NZ Review Lee's book does an excellent job of clearly organizing the films so that they reflect how Koreans have seen themselves... -- Korean Quarterly

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Author's Bio

Hyangjin Lee is a Senior Teaching Fellow in the School of East Asian Studies at the University of Sheffield

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