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Counting for Nothing: What Men Value and What Women are Worth

Counting for Nothing: What Men Value and What Women are Worth
 

This classic feminist analysis of women's place in the world economy has been brought up to date with a sizeable new introduction. Waring argues that monetary value needs to be attributed to unpaid work -- productive and reproductive -- in order to make this work visible, influen... read full description below.

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ISBN 9780802082602
Published 11 May 1999 by University of Toronto Press
Format Trade Paperback/Paperback, 2nd Revised edition
Alternate Format(s) View All (2 other possible title(s) available)
Author(s) By Waring, Marilyn
Introduction by Steinem, Gloria
Availability Internationally sourced on backorder; allow 4-8 weeks

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Full details for this title

ISBN-13 9780802082602
ISBN-10 0802082602
Stock Available
Status Internationally sourced on backorder; allow 4-8 weeks
Publisher University of Toronto Press
Imprint University of Toronto Press
Publication Date 11 May 1999
International Publication Date 15 December 1999
Publication Country Canada Canada
Format Trade Paperback/Paperback, 2nd Revised edition
Edition 2nd Revised edition
Author(s) By Waring, Marilyn
Introduction by Steinem, Gloria
Category Philosophy
Number of Pages 216
Dimensions Width: 153mm
Height: 229mm
Spine: 25mm
Weight 530g
Interest Age General Audience
Reading Age General Audience
Library of Congress Sex discrimination in national income accounting, Women - Economic conditions
NBS Text Philosophy
ONIX Text General/trade;College/higher education
Dewey Code 339.30723
Catalogue Code Not specified

Description of this Book

This classic feminist analysis of women's place in the world economy has been brought up to date with a sizeable new introduction. Waring argues that monetary value needs to be attributed to unpaid work -- productive and reproductive -- in order to make this work visible, influence policies and concepts, and question values. Bibliography.

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Awards, Reviews & Star Ratings

NZ Review <p>'I've often commented on the way the work of women is excluded from our national accounting and overlooked in economics in general. And, alas, I've done very little about it. Now this splendid work goes far to fill this appalling gap. No concerned woman (or man) can ignore it.' -- John Kenneth Galbraith, Harvard University

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Author's Bio

Marilyn Waring is a professor in the Institute of Public Policy at the Auckland University of Technology.

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