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The Time Machine

The Time Machine

H. G. Wells wrote The Time Machine in 1895; it was his first science fiction novel, and has remained one of his best. In The Time Machine, a Victorian scientist develops a time machine and travels 800,000 years into the future, to an age when mankind has split into two separate s... read full description below.

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ISBN 9781453605073
Published 31 May 2010 by Createspace
Format Trade Paperback/Paperback
Alternate Format(s) View All (296 other possible title(s) available)
Audio CD
35
Hardback
26
Trade Paperback
163
Paperback
35
Library Binding
8
ePub
16
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2
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8
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Author(s) By Wells, H. G.
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Full details for this title

ISBN-13 9781453605073
ISBN-10 145360507X
Stock Out of stock
Status Not currently available
Publisher Createspace
Imprint Createspace
Publication Date 31 May 2010
Publication Country United States United States
Format Trade Paperback/Paperback
Author(s) By Wells, H. G.
Category General & Literary Fiction
Adventure / Thriller
Science Fiction
Romantic Fiction
Classic Fiction
Number of Pages 82 pp
Dimensions Width: 140mm
Height: 216mm
Spine: 4mm
Weight 104g
Interest Age 16+ years
Reading Age 16+ years
NBS Text Science Fiction & Fantasy
ONIX Text Children/juvenile
Dewey Code 741.5
Catalogue Code Not specified

Description of this Book

H. G. Wells wrote The Time Machine in 1895; it was his first science fiction novel, and has remained one of his best. In The Time Machine, a Victorian scientist develops a time machine and travels 800,000 years into the future, to an age when mankind has split into two separate species. One group, the spawn of capitalist ease and affluence, has been reduced to the mental and physical level of children; the other group has become feral after eons of industrial toil. Neither group is human any longer; culture and intelligence have died out forever. In fact, with the social tables turned, the lower orders now use their betters as a food source! Questions relating to human progress imbue The Time Machine, as do questions relating to whether or not a world infested with problems truly is worse than a world without any trouble. H. G. Wells vision of human decline was subversive and eloquent, and offered a wry counterpoint to the Victorian cult of progress. The penultimate chapter -- in which the time traveler voyages 30 million years into the future, to an era when the sun is dying, humanity is long-extinct, and lichens have inherited the earth -- is heartbreaking. No doubt The Time Machine will outlive many other classics, for generations to come!

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Author's Bio

Herbert George Wells (1866-1946) was an English author, now best known for his work in the science fiction genre. He was also a prolific writer in many other genres, including contemporary novels, history, politics and social commentary. Together with Jules Verne, Wells has been referred to as The Father of Science Fiction. Wells was an outspoken socialist and sympathetic to pacifist views, although he supported the First World War once it was under way, and his later works became increasingly political and didactic. His middle period novels (1900-1920) were less science-fictional; they covered lower-middle class life (The History of Mr Polly) and the 'New Woman' and the Suffragettes (Ann Veronica).

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