Wheelers Books

A Wunch of Bankers: A year in the Hayne royal commission

A Wunch of Bankers: A year in the Hayne royal commission

It wasn't just its exhaustive rounds of hearings around the country - Melbourne, Brisbane, Darwin, and Sydney - on topics from farming finance to financial planning. It wasn't even the long list of scandals exposed to a horrified nation - charging fees to dead people, blatant con... read full description below.

Usually ships 6-12 working days – This title is in stock at publisher

Quick Reference

ISBN 9781925849363
Barcode 9781925849363
Published 2 July 2019 by Scribe Publications
Format Trade Paperback/Paperback
Alternate Format(s) View All (2 other possible title(s) available)
Author(s) By Ziffer, Daniel
Availability In stock at publisher; ships 6-12 working days

... view full title details below.

Buy Now

  • $37.00 Retail price
  • $28.86 Wheelers price
  • You save $8.14!
Add to Basket Add to Wishlist

Full details for this title

ISBN-13 9781925849363
ISBN-10 1925849368
Stock Available
Status In stock at publisher; ships 6-12 working days
Publisher Scribe Publications
Imprint Scribe Publications
Publication Date 2 July 2019
International Release Date 7 April 2020
Publication Country Australia Australia
Format Trade Paperback/Paperback
Author(s) By Ziffer, Daniel
Category Criminal Investigation & Detection
Banking
Financial Services Industry
Banking Law
Australian
Number of Pages 368
Dimensions Width: 152mm
Height: 233mm
Spine: 27mm
Weight 484g
Interest Age General Audience
Reading Age General Audience
NBS Text Law: General & Reference
ONIX Text General/trade
Dewey Code 332.1
Catalogue Code 992907

Description of this Book

It wasn't just its exhaustive rounds of hearings around the country - Melbourne, Brisbane, Darwin, and Sydney - on topics from farming finance to financial planning. It wasn't even the long list of scandals exposed to a horrified nation - charging fees to dead people, blatant conflicts of interest, and taking $1 billion from customers in fees that banks were never entitled to. What made it so fascinating, so heart-breaking, and so enraging was the procession of faces through the witness box, and the team of counsel gazing into the dark heart of banking. Tearful victims, blank-faced executives, hapless regulators, and a couple of utter charlatans all had their day in court, watched by an audience of millions, and revealing - in their stories - the material to justify re-shaping the multi-trillion dollar financial services industry that forms a pillar of Australian life. A Wunch of Bankers covers not just the big shocks, but the small moments - lost in the flurry of daily reporting - that reveal how companies have used the law, limp enforcement, and basic human behaviour to take advantage of customers. Is there a phrase that judges how much life-insurance spruikers in call centres can terrify you about your impending death - and the grief-stricken ruins of an estate you'll leave for your bereaved family - while still being legal? Yes, there is. Was there a meeting in which a bank's executives ignored a warning of Extreme from its chief risk officer, to embark on an illegal scheme that accrued $3.6 billion in funds? There was. Mixed among the testimony are snippets from life on the road as the World's Oldest Debuting TV Reporter - not just driving five hours one-way to talk to a man who almost blew his brains out over a bank nabbing his $22 million estate, but explaining how journalism can only ever give you a glimpse inside complex issues. In A Wunch of Bankers, Dan Ziffer bring out the colour and grit of the royal commission's proceedings, and explores broader issues raised by the testimony. A mixture of analysis, reportage, and observations, it is densely researched and compellingly written. It wasn't just its exhaustive rounds of hearings around the country - Melbourne, Brisbane, Darwin, and Sydney - on topics from farming finance to financial planning. It wasn't even the long list of scandals exposed to a horrified nation - charging fees to dead people, blatant conflicts of interest, and taking $1 billion from customers in fees that banks were never entitled to. What made it so fascinating, so heart-breaking, and so enraging was the procession of faces through the witness box, and the team of counsel gazing into the dark heart of banking. Tearful victims, blank-faced executives, hapless regulators, and a couple of utter charlatans all had their day in court, watched by an audience of millions, and revealing - in their stories - the material to justify re-shaping the multi-trillion dollar financial services industry that forms a pillar of Australian life. A Wunch of Bankers covers not just the big shocks, but the small moments - lost in the flurry of daily reporting - that reveal how companies have used the law, limp enforcement, and basic human behaviour to take advantage of customers. Is there a phrase that judges how much life-insurance spruikers in call centres can terrify you about your impending death - and the grief-stricken ruins of an estate you'll leave for your bereaved family - while still being legal? Yes, there is. Was there a meeting in which a bank's executives ignored a warning of Extreme from its chief risk officer, to embark on an illegal scheme that accrued $3.6 billion in funds? There was. Mixed among the testimony are snippets from life on the road as the World's Oldest Debuting TV Reporter - not just driving five hours one-way to talk to a man who almost blew his brains out over a bank nabbing his $22 million estate, but explaining how journalism can only ever give you a glimpse inside complex issues. In A Wunch of Bankers, Dan Ziffer brings out the colour and grit of the royal commission's proceedings, and explores broader issues raised by the testimony. A mixture of analysis, reportage, and observations, it is densely researched and compellingly written.

^ top

Awards, Reviews & Star Ratings

There are no reviews for this title.

^ top

Author's Bio

Daniel Ziffer covered the Hayne royal commission for ABC radio, TV, and online. He was formerly the long-time senior producer of 'Mornings with Jon Faine', at ABC Radio Melbourne, and has worked on air and in production at Macquarie Radio, as a freelance foreign correspondent based in New York City, a journalist at The Age, and as a magazine editor.

^ top